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Inside Studying the Outside

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By Kathryn Wrigley

Colors burst forth from the trees.  It is fall.  Or so my Instagram feed, chocked full of apple cider donuts and flaming red trees, portends.

I am soaking in the beige and pale yellow of my desk in the University of Vermont’s Aiken building.  The first-year Field Naturalists appear sporadically to study, still in the midst of their first-semester field courses.  I’m square in the mid-semester of my second year.

My field work from the summer seems like a dream as plot data fills in the squares of Excel spreadsheets – the ostensibly dull side of the field ecologist’s life.  Yet I gain a certain excitement from all the numbers. I’m a detective, a quantifying detective.  I see patterns on the landscape during the summer.  Will they emerge from my data?  Will I find an unexpected pattern?

Since I do not have the brisk fall air to keep me alert and awake, coffee and classical music fuel me.  Oddly enough, this inside work is why I am here at school.  At age 15, I swore to myself I would never work inside.  I worked outside for the next 15 years.  During my time in recreation management, I wondered about the ecological aspects of low-impact recreation.  What were the effects of backcountry rock quarries?  What were the impacts of mountain bike trails?  Were rock climbers threatening rare plants?

For my masters project I delve into low-impact recreation as I explore whether glading, clearing in the trees where skiers can make multiple linked turns, has an effect on wildlife habitat suitability.  I am inside, studying the outside.  Working for all those years outside led me to realize that humans and landscapes cannot be managed separately.  In the spring, I hope to leave this beige and yellow world to work for an organization that focuses on the importance of the ecological and social aspects of conservation.

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