Conservation, Discoveries, Natural Destinations

Secrets of The Vault

By Julie Runcie –

Sean and I are in The Vault. We’ve been here for a while—hours now. It’s less grandiose than it sounds, really just a back room in the Charlotte Town Hall, but it gives me the same feeling I get from the New York Public Library or a fancy art museum. Tread lightly, the walls are saying. Look closely. We have secrets for you.

Inside The Vault. Photo by Samantha Ford.
Inside The Vault. Photo by Samantha Ford.

What’s amazing is that the secrets of The Vault are not really secret at all. Every document in the room is in the public record, even the original map of the Town of Charlotte, hand-drawn in 1763. The massive red books of land records, the card catalogues of births and deaths—these pages of history are not preserved behind glass; we are perfectly free to look at them. I can reach out a hand, every now and then, to gently trace this two-hundred-and-fifty-year-old calligraphy.

We’re here to research the UVM Natural Area at Pease Mountain, a prominent hill directly west of the Charlotte Town Hall and just north of Mount Philo along the Champlain thrust fault. This semester, our cohort is performing a Landscape Inventory and Assessment of the area. We’ve spent several weekends strolling along the mountain’s broken quartzite ledges, and we’re starting to get a sense of the property’s natural resources. The soil is thin but rich, patterned here and there with the frostbitten remains of last year’s hepatica leaves. The trees are not the usual beech-birch-maple assortment we expected, but a variety of species used to warmer, drier climates: peeling trunks of shagbark hickory, gnarled red oaks, bitternut hickories with their sulfur-yellow buds. We’ve noticed hints of other mysteries: a road cut here, an old stone foundation there. UVM acquired the property in 1949; Sean and I want to know who has owned Pease Mountain–and what it’s been used for–as far back as the town’s records go.

20160329_105958
First subdivision of the town of Charlotte.

We start by looking in the Index, a twenty-pound tome containing a list of every land transaction undertaken in Charlotte until the book ran out of pages around 1960. Thankfully the Index is alphabetized and we quickly find the record we need: “Jeanette S. Pease Phelps and George J. Holden to University of Vermont and State Agricultural College.”

I’m immediately absorbed in the web of archaic legalese that follows: “Now, know ye, That pursuant to the license and authority aforesaid, and not otherwise…We do by these Presents, grant, bargain, sell, convey and confirm unto the said University of Vermont…the following described land…Being Pease Mountain, so-called, in the town of Charlotte.” The deed was written barely more than half a century ago, but it reads like something from the middle ages. The solemn tone is compelling. I can picture the occasion, the buyers and sellers grouped around a table, poised to sign below the words, “In witness whereof, we hereunto set our hands and seals…”

Original charter of the town of Williston. Photo by Samantha Ford.
Original charter of the town of Williston. Photo by Samantha Ford.

We follow the trail further and further back, tracing property descriptions bounded by increasingly vague terms: “…to the N.E. corner of said lot to a maple stump with a cedar stake in said stump. Thence southerly on the west line of said owned by Everett Rich to a cedar stake & stones in the S.E. corner. Thence westerly on the north line…” The record books get thinner as we travel back in time, the pages more brittle, the writing fainter. Eventually we find ourselves scrutinizing a gridded map: the second subdivision of the town.

Accompanying the map with its numbered parcels, we find a list of the original owners of those parcels. Lot number 1, which at the time encompassed most of Pease Mountain, is ascribed to “Glebe for the Church.” We puzzle over this. Who was Glebe? We haven’t heard any mention of him in more recent deeds. Was he a minister?

Glebe for the Church. It sounds like a momentous designation. We finally think to Google the strange phrase, and we discover the ancient tradition of glebe land. It’s not a person after all, but a kind of conservation easement. When Vermont’s first towns were established, certain plots of land were set aside to remain undeveloped. These lands were leased to farmers or timber harvesters in exchange for a rental fee, which paid for municipal costs or, in this case, the upkeep of the parish. For hundreds of years, Pease Mountain was preserved by this tradition.

Mysterious stone structure found on Pease Mountain.
One of several mysterious stone structures found on Pease Mountain.

As we leave the Town Hall, Sean and I glance up at Pease. Our journey through the handwritten history of Charlotte has given us a deeper sense of this place. As we’ve walked there with our cohort we’ve mapped natural communities and forest stands, discovered vernal pools and views over the lake. But walking and looking can only take us so far back. Beyond the oaks and hickories, the purple cliffs, the porcupine and bobcat dens, there is another Pease Mountain story. It’s no longer legible in the landscape. But luckily for us, it’s all written down in the record books.

Julia Runcie is a first-year student in the Ecological Planning program.

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